Baby Clothes Buying Guide for First Time Moms

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Baby Clothes Buying Guide for First Time Moms

Clothes Buying Guide for First Time Moms

Buying clothes for a newborn baby can be quite the task, especially if you are a first-time mommy. It’s not as simple as just walking into a shop and picking clothes off the rack. You need to consider the size, how long you’re baby will fit into the clothes, the material and the number of pieces.

 

What kind of clothing do you need?

Don’t go overboard. Babies grow really quickly, and the clothes you think will last you a couple of months, might only fit for a couple of weeks. Buy a little bit of everything as opposed to a whole lot. Also, consider the season your baby will be born and purchase accordingly. By the time the season is over, your baby will have outgrown all of those clothes, and you will have already purchased clothes for the next season and the next growing phase.

You will also need to consider the colour of clothing you want to buy. But colours aren’t always gender specific so feel free to be adventurous.

 

Don’t buy too many items at a time

Don’t buy too much of the same size clothing, because before you know it, they will have outgrown their clothes and you will need to buy more. However, babies change their clothing at least two to three times a day, which makes it twenty-one outfits a week, and you don’t want them wearing the same things every week. So you will need a lot of clothing. Finding a balance is key – not too much so that they never get to wear everything before outgrowing it; not too little so that they have to wear the same clothes every week. Remember, babies are sensitive in any and every way – dust and dirt, and dirty clothes will not do. Everything they come in contact with needs to be clean — usually sterilised so that they don’t get sick.

 

Must Have’s

Make sure the following is on your list: bodysuits, comfortable playgro suits, sleeping suits, long and short sleeved tees, long and short cotton pants, cardigans, coats, socks and, depending on the season, sunhats. These are the best options and even if the bunny suit is really cute –check to see if it’s practical. How easy or difficult is it to put it on baby. The more difficult it is to put on, the less likely you are to dress baby in it.

 

What size is right, and what materials are most comfortable?

Cotton is soft, absorbent and gentle on a baby’s skin. It is the most common and widely used baby clothing material because of this. Keep in mind that cotton shrinks at least 10% with first wash, so maybe look at buying a size bigger in all cotton clothes.

 

Cotton/Polyester Blends

This kind of blend dries quickly and resists creasing and is generally less expensive.

 

Cotton/Spandex Blends

Buy clothing made from this material for your baby’s ultimate comfort. Because this material is stretchy, it moves with your baby’s body, making it a very comfortable material for baby.

 

Fleece

This is best in the winter time because of its warm and fuzzy quality. Fleece dries quickly, and is easy to care for.

 

Cashmere

Cashmere is extremely soft but expensive since it is a luxury textile. Your baby doesn’t need expensive clothes, they outgrown them fast and you could use the money to buy your baby something that could last longer like a great quality pram.

Size is probably the most crucial aspect of buying baby clothing. Keep in mind that sizes change from brand to brand, even though it might say 1 – 2 months.

 

Baby clothing sizes

Here is a basic guide to baby clothing sizes:

00000: Premmie – Up to 3kg in weight – Up to 46cm in height

0000: Newborn – 3 – 4 kg in weight – 46 – 55cm in height

000: 0-3 months – 4 – 6 kg in weight – 55 – 62 cm in height

00: 3-6 months – 6 – 8 kg in weight – 62 – 68 cm in height

These are sizes found during the quickest growing phases of baby’s life. Some clothing brands also indicate chest size and head size. Also consider things like wide necks, press-studs, washing and caring instructions and decorative strings or ribbons that could possibly be hazardous to a small baby.

Shopping for your baby can be a lot of fun if you’re prepared.

 

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