How to survive the "why" stage Print E-mail

From the age of two or three, little people become very inquisitive and they quickly learn to say one single word “Why?” This word is usually said over and over and over again, in quick succession, until even the most patient of mothers, need to take a few deep breaths, and compose themselves. 

Moms before us have passed down useful coping mechanisms that will help today’s busy moms to survive the “why” stage. It is simple – books! Books contain answers to the most fascinating and to the most arbitrary of questions – “why is the grass green?” or “why do birds fly” and even “why can’t I eat sweets for breakfast?” Smart children’s authors realised that there was a demand for ‘why’ books and began writing kid’s book on how and why and by using cute pictures and illustrations, the child’s wave of whys are answered and dealt with – even if it is only for the day.

Try to use the bombardment of questions to interact with the child, sit down with them, read the book and let them pour over the pictures. Books are great ways to learn and with so many wonderful titles for sale, the child may end up knowing more than you do.

If the answers cannot be found in the kid’s book, show your child that you really mean business and tell the curious ‘why’ monster, that you will need to “ask the computer” – Google it, you are bound to find the answers on the Internet, even answers to life’s most puzzling questions such as “why do kids always have to ask why?” Kids are curious by nature and even though their flood of why’s do get a little much after the tenth one, take a deep breath and realise that it is all part of growing up and this too shall pass.  The tables will soon turn and it will be your turn to play the why game – why are you so late? Why did you not do your maths homework?

However, if all else fails – a great coping mechanism is to suggest to the ever enquiring child that all future why questions be handled by dad!

 

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