Home Reflux

Reflux

Acid reflux, also known as Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), occurs when stomach contents back up into the esophagus during or after a meal, resulting in regurgitation, or spitting up, and vomiting. It is a common condition, and occurs usually because babies digestive tracts are not fully developed. It starts at around 4 weeks with pain and some spitting up. The spitting up peaks at about 2 months, reflux pain peaks at about 4 months, and the condition usually dissipates by around 7 to 8 months.
Symptoms
Impatience
Impulsiveness
Marked talkativeness
Frequent fidgeting
Difficulty controlling emotions
Interrupts constantly
Easily distracted
Can’t follow instructions
Does not complete tasks
Forgetful & loses focus
Runny nose
Cough
Watery eyes
Swollen glands
Sore throat
Headache
Stomach – Upset tummy
Vomiting
Wheezing
Swelling of the throat
Anaphylactic shock
Frequent coughing
Wheezing or whistling sound when exhaling
Tightness of the chest
Shortness of breath
Sleep problems due to difficulty breathing
Delayed recovery following a respiratory infection
Avoidance of exercise
Runny nose
Sneezing
Fever
Cough
Wheezing
Laboured breathing
Noticeable rising of chest
Itchy, red rash on whole body
Raised bumps that become small fluid-filled blisters
Headache
Abdominal pain
Loss of appetite
Fever
Irritability and discomfort
Itchy, red rash on whole body
Congested or runny nose
Nasal discharge that starts out clear but becomes yellow or green
Possible ear pain
Sensitive eyes
Fussiness
Low-grade fever
Sneezing & coughing
Headache
Disruptions in sleeping patterns
Hacking cough
Sore throat
Raspy voice
Laboured breathing
Noise while inhaling
Increased thirst
Excessive hunger
Rapid weight gain or loss
Fatigue
Irritability
Erratic behaviour
Blurred vision
Genital yeast infections
Severe nappy rash
Very painful ear
Reduced hearing
General discomfort
High temperature
Discharge from the ear
Red, leathery skin
Blistery appearance
Itchiness
Dryness
Increased thirst
Facial rash followed by intermittent lacelike rash on trunks, arms and legs
Sore throat
Runny nose
Low-grade fever
Sore throat
Headache
Fatigue
Chills
Drowsiness
Weakness
Sudden high fever
Achy body
Reduced appetite
Dizziness
Sinus problems
Nausea
Achy body
Headache
Low-grade fever
Nausea
Vomiting
Cramps
Abdominal pain
Watery diarrhea
Chills
Runny nose
Swollen glands
Low- or high-grade fever
Raised, fine red rash on face then entire body
Itchy and inflamed scalp
Rash
Scratching may lead to bacterial infection
Fatigue
Fever
Irritability
Loss of appetite
Sore throat
Painful blister-like sores in and around the mouth
Rash on palms, fingers and soles of feet
Fatigue
Hacking cough
Low-grade fever
Runny nose
Sensitivity to light
General malaise
Eye irritation
Faint pink spots on 4th day
Confusion
Faint pink spots on 4th day
Headache – Extreme, specific headache
High fever
Lack of eye contact
Loss of appetite
Seizures
Sensitivity to light
Skin rash
Sleepiness
Stiff neck
Vomiting or nausea
Headache
Fever
Fatigue
Pain when chewing or swallowing
Swollen salivary glands on the side of the jaw
Irritability and discomfort
Joined patches of redness and scaling in the nappy area
Fungal and secondary bacterial infections spread to the skin folds, which exhibit an extremely red, painful rash and/or blisters
Abdominal pain
Fatigue
Diarrhea
Digestive problems
Bloating of stomach
Anemia
Asthma
Skin rashes
Scratchy feeling in eye
Redness in whites of eyes
White or yellow discharge which glues eyes shut
Fever
Weakness
Coughing
Rapid breathing
Chest and muscle pain
Chills and sweating
Nausea and vomiting
Vomiting
Irritability
Coughing
Often confused with colic
Gagging
Poor feeding
Poor weight gain
Blood in stools
Sleep disorders
Treatments
Treatment will often start with a class of medications called H2-blockers, that help keep acid from backing up the esophagus
A second class of medications often used to reduce stomach acid is proton-pump inhibitors, which block the production of stomach acid Surgery in severe cases
Remedies
Feed upright and keep upright for 30 minutes after feeding
Feed frequent, small meals
Do not overfeed
Burp frequently
Thicken feeds with cereal
Avoid acidic drinks, acidic food and vegetables when starting solids
Ingest ginger root extract with honey
Drink rooibos tea
Administer non-alcoholic gripe water
Administer ColicCalm, a homeopathic remedy
Sleep with head raised
Risk
1-2
1 – Can be treated at home
2 – Medical attention is necessary
3 – Urgent medical assistance is necessary
Disclaimer:
As always, take your newborn, baby, toddler or older child to your doctor if symptoms are severe or worrying. Our guide is just that, a guide, and does NOT replace medical supervision.

 

 

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